Shutterbug’s Essential Guide To Better Photography Skills

Shutterbug's Essential Guide To Better Photography Skills

Shutterbug’s Essential Guide To Better Photography Skills

Photography can employ a lot of different techniques depending upon whom you ask or talk to about it. We all know that a clear shot generally constitutes a good photo, but there is so much more to a photo than that. Take some time to better your skills by using the tips below.

Play with the aperture settings. Take a number of photos of the same subject with different settings to see how it affects the look of the final photo. Bigger f-stops allow you to get an entire landscape in focus, while a smaller f-stop will draw attention only to the center of your frame.

Keep your pictures relatively simple. A good image should be straightforward and easy to interpret and appreciate. It is important to take meaningful pictures, but in most cases your pictures will say more if you focus on a detail rather than put together a complex composition that might not strike people as much.

Don’t stay inside when the weather is bad. Although it’s natural to think a sunny day is the best time to grab the camera, overcast and rainy days provide an opportunity to get shots that would be hard to get at any other time. These weather conditions can give shots that would look neutral or cheery on a sunny day a dark and foreboding tone.

Do not use the flash on a camera unless you are in a darker location. Using a flash outdoors in a location that already has a lot of light will just make your picture come out too bright. Some cameras have an automatic flash setting so that your camera knows when the flash is needed.

Keep your photo subject simple. The busier the subject is the more difficult it is to capture something that is going to be interesting. Keeping the backgrounds simple will make it easier for the eye to focus on the subject that you are capturing. Keeping it uncomplicated seems simple, but many forget to do it.

Use a polarizing lens filter on your camera to minimize glare from direct sunlight and to create an even distribution of light. This is essential when shooting in direct sunlight, but also can be beneficial in any lighting situation. Think of polarizing lens filters as sunglasses for your camera. They are inexpensive, easy to attach and have the added benefit of protecting your expensive lenses from scratches.

When you are dealing with low lighting settings and you do not have a tripod, try to be aware of your shutter speed. Make sure it has a denominator that is greater than the focal length of the lens. Otherwise, you will not be able to capture sharp images.

Try to use some natural lighting. You will want to pick the best time of the day to take your outdoor photos, evening or morning is the best. Strong natural light casts long shadows and causes the people you are photographing to squint. Use sunlight, candlelight and artificial light to see how each affects the subject of your photographs.

Take candid shots. Instead of taking posed pictures, try taking pictures of your subject with family at work or doing something they love. When your subject is comfortable they will be more at ease and you will end up getting some unique shots. This works especially well when trying to photograph children.

It is true that you should have a clear shot of the subject in a photo. That said, there is much more to a good photo than just that. You can always improve upon your shots, and hopefully these tips gave you advice on how you can do precisely that.

 

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